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francisco. san francisco has palm trees. the same latitude is san francisco. here's washington, d.c. honey, the best they can do are cherry trees, okay? [laughter] no palm trees. the only palm trees in washington, d.c. are in the hotel lobbies, okay? right? but we have palm trees in san francisco, and why is that? same latitude, same amount of sunshine per unit area, see? but it turns out, what? we got the gulf stream-- not the gulf stream-- we've got the ocean out here. now that ocean, if that ocean in the wintertime cools down a little bit, what's the air do? you wu. - warm up. - warm up, okay? and if it blows this way, what's it hit? begin with a cal f-o-r-n-i-- so california is a much warmer place in the winter than east coast communities of the same latitude. ain't that neat, okay? in fact, any place that's surrounded by water has just about the same temperature all year round. how about the best place in the world, right here? [laughter] that's hawaii, huh? the hawaiian islands, okay? the hawaiian islands about the same temperature all year round, but not only the hawaiian islands. i
to that. now, i had friend from japan, for example, come over to see me in san francisco and he saw all the bars on the windows. "what are all these bars for?" i said, "that's to keep the thieves out." he say, "you guys are living with--you got the bars on the wrong side-- bars are on the thieves." "oh, no, no. the thieves have their rights, man, you know?" and other thing is we get so used to it, so used to it. first, the bar on this one as ain't before, you know, the whole city is a barricade, you know? something that happens slowly, slowly, slowly, you get used to and you accept. it's like the nuclear missiles, right? first a few, right? then a few more, then a few more gradually they-- living in a whole world ready to blow up and well, you kinda get used to it. [laughter] small enough doses. something happens in san francisco at fisherman's wharf all the time that kinda bothers me. it's like auschwitz there. auschwitz. you get down there you wanna get your crabs, you wanna get your lobsters or you go to fisherman's wharf and you wanna order a nice lobster dinner. now how do you-- wh
's bad. i remember way back in the seventies when i-- it used to be common back then in san francisco in the seventies to go hot tubbing. you guys, when you meet someone new, you go to a movie or something, right? [laughter] i remember one time, this lady, i asked her out, asked her to go to a movie. says, "why don't we just get to know each other better? why don't we go to the grand central hot tubs?" [laughter] i don't know her yet, you know? i have this--my fondest dreams went a little bit too fast. "can i handle this?" you know? it's a true story, by the way. and so--yeah, we went to the hot tub. hey, and in the hot tubs, all my students were there. "hey, what are you doing here?" "hey, mister hewitt, what are you doing here?" [laughter] "hey, hewitt. "hey, that check-your-neighbor routine worked, didn't it? hey, all right." but, anyway, i got in the hot tub there, and it's really, really hot, yeah? and i'm in there, and she's outside, and she says, "come on here, let's--come over here, i'll give you a rub down." "oh, i'll just stay in the water here a little longer." [laughter] t
, and that is an epic of percentages are still undecided. for more we go to san francisco where we're joined by one of the measure's leading supporters, jeanne woodford, the former warden of san quentin state prison, where she oversaw four executions. she says she did her job, but didn't think it was the right thing to do. warden woodford has also served as the undersecretary director of the california department of corrections and rehabilitation. she is from executive director of death penalty focus of california, which educates the public about alternatives to the death penalty. jeanne woodford, welcome to "democracy now!" why don't you lay out exactly what this ballot initiative would do. >> the proposition 34-3 simple things. it takes the existing law and crosses out death penalty, and leaves life without the possibility of parole as the harshest punishment in california. it sets aside $100 million in total to be spent over 3.5 years for the sole purpose of solving 46% of homicides and 56% of reported rapes that go unsolved each year on average in the state of california. finally, it requires a
that happened? >> i was coming back from san francisco. i had been at a meeting. i had made my presentation to the principle, a high school conference, and i was to have dinner with a group that evening so that we continue. something said, you need to go home. i am a poet. i have shared this before. something said, you need to go home. i said, if i leave downtown san francisco now, i can be at sfo by 9:00. if i do that, i can be on the 10:50 redeye. that is what i wish to report. i told the principal, i'm sorry, but i have a strong feeling i need to go. i was never thinking i was coming into a buzz saw. all i flew all night into charlotte. i went down in charlotte. i can go to sleep easily. god has given me a great gift. i can sleep anytime. we got into charlotte and i woke up. we got into charlotte. it was 6:15 in the morning. we should have been here around 9:00, but the winter was that. so i just went back to sleep for the announcement. the next one was canceled because of the wind. but the airport does not that you have any information. we had no idea what was going on. those coming int
of san francisco. >> it has been said if in mexico were to secede from the u.s., it would be the third bus powerful nuclear nation in the world. >> that is correct in terms of numbers. people who fly out of the albuquerque airport, if you know where to look, and it is very obscure, but if you know where to look, you can see as you take off about 2 miles out there is a repository that may have up to 3000 nuclear warheads. all the enough, it is a good thing they are there. bush sr. unilaterally retired a bunch of these weapons while there was a possible coup in moscow, but they are still awaiting [indiscernible] what we need to do instead of building up our arsenal, which we're doing, and extending the lives of the weapons, we need to be dismantling them and working off the -- >> chuck montaÑo, your final comment? >> i sympathize with what is happening in the navajo nation. my experience at the lab, i worked in safeguards when i first came into the lab. i know a lot of the material was improperly disposed of. in the early 1980's, they had open pits called area g. right before regulation
, the san francisco bay area, miami, the washington, d.c. area, sacramento, chicago, and orlando. walmart workers are not unionized and have long complained of poor working conditions and inadequate wages. according to organizers, employees are protesting company attempts to "silence and retaliate against workers for speaking out for improvement on the job." this is walmart associate carlton smith speaking in june at walmart's annual shareholder meeting in bentonville, arkansas. >> made a commitment the the rapinoe retaliation for association if we choose to organize together to help walmart better, but we continue to expense retaliation against associates who speak out for change. >> some striking walmart associates plan to protest again today at a walmart annual investor meeting at its headquarters in arkansas. walmart did not respond to our request for comment. to find out more but the significance of the strike, we go to bentonville, arkansas, to talk to mike compton, a walmart warehouse employee in elwood, illinois. in new york, we're joined by josh eidelson, who broke the story last
at the virginia military institute. campaign later that day in san francisco, president obama said romney is wrong to oppose the winding down of the iraq war. >> governor romney has a different view. he said it is tragic to end the war in iraq. he doubled down that believe in a speech today, saying it was a mistake. i disagree. bringing our troops home was the right thing to do. [applause] every great american who wears a uniform of this country should know that as long as i am commander in chief, we will sustain the strongest military the world has ever known. and when our troops take off their uniforms, we will serve them as well as they have served us. >> during his remarks, obama also addressed his debate performance in denver last week, saying supporters had criticized him for being too nice. >> after the debate i had a bunch of folks say, "don't be so nice." [applause] but i want everyone to understand something. what was being presented wasn't leadership, but salesmanship. >> a rare form of fungal meningitis linked to steroid injections has killed at least eight people in the u.s. and sicke
is an article from the san francisco newspaper. it was an article complaining of or were a prisoner complaints of guards taking literature from a cell. another piece is 8 that he had with a dragon on it, which is considered a gang symbol by the department corrections for the third piece of evidence was the journal he kept in which he wrote about african-american history. he mentions nat turner, malcolm x, has statistics about the number of hangings in the mid- 20s century of african americans. in it he has a quote by george jackson which is used as evidence of gang affiliation. so he has been in for four years now and does not know when he will get out. >> you're right, the decision to put a man in solitary indefinitely is made and internal hearings the prisoners and last about 20 minutes, closed-door affairs. i was told i could not win this one, no one can pick any one of the sec, when josh fatal and i finally, for the revolutionary court in iran, we had a lawyer present but were not able to speak to him. in california, an inmate facing the worst punishment our penal system has to offer short
of sound. and so like if aircraft go from san francisco to new york faster than the speed of sound, guess what there's a trail underneath there. wreckage, honey, wreckage, because that shock wave is gonna drag right across the ground and hit everyone underneath there. so, you got a chicken coop there that's not built too well, right? all of a sudden-- and it is even worse, 'cause it turns out that the high-pressure region is followed by a low-pressure region. ever be waterskiing? then you go to the edges, hoop, you come up like that? what's on the other side. hoo, down. --on this side, called the bow wave, you know? i think not the bow wave, the tail wave, see? 'cause you get overlappings of high pressure and you get overlappings of low pressure. in the case of sound, you get overlappings of-- what do you call it, compressions. where all the compressions overlap, high pressure, where all the rarefactions overlap, low pressure is what you get. all of a sudden boom, high pressure followed by low pressure. this are like boom, boom and-- so it's even more devastating than sonic boom because o
chickens at the institute's 1.5-acre student-run farm in st. helena, 2 hours north of san francisco. >> make sure they have plenty of water. we usually change it twice, at least twice a day. >> then it's time to harvest the potatoes he planted a few months ago. >> last year, we had a lot of different crops, but we didn't have potatoes. so this season, it was definitely something that i wanted to try. >> he came to the institute from the east coast hoping to become a chef, never realizing he'd end up laboring on a farm, learning first-hand all about farming and growing local produce like squash. these colorful blossoms are harvested as well, even if they're not fully open. >> we have a dish which--it's a squash blossom risotto, and with the open ones, we just kind of stir it into the risotto at the last minute, so it kind of wilts, and it swirls around. >> he's one of about 72 students getting an associate degree at the culinary institute, which claims to be the world's premier culinary college. steve ells, who founded the chain chipotle, graduated from the cia in 1990, and cat cora,
of northern california, midway between san francisco and sacramento. once you step inside, you'll soon realize it's 3 acres of land that's bursting with color, wonderful smells, and a huge variety of all kinds of herbs and plants. >> this is an ornamental sage called salvia san carlos festival. this one is a soapwort, saponaria. and the old soapworts, of course, you would take the leaves, and you could actually make them into a natural soap. this is one of our favorite sages, grape-scented sage. the flowers taste like grapes. >> for the last 15 years, rose loveall-sale and her husband dan have been running this farm, but the land has actually been in their family for generations. >> this property at one point was owned by my great-grandparents, and then they sold it to some friends who sold it back to my parents. and they grew walnut trees here. so--and my family actually has been here since the mid-teens of the last century. and they've been farming this area, this valley. >> rose studied forestry at u.c. berkeley but soon realized she really loved planting things. so, together, she and dan d
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)